Updating paths is incompatible with switching branchesforcing

Say "git add -u ." or "git add -A ." if you want to limit the operation to the current directory.Although this is a clearer explanation, it’s not very clear what is changing, so let me give you can example.If you haven’t seen the following warning while doing ‘warning: The behavior of 'git add --update (or -u)' with no path argument from a subdirectory of the tree will change in Git 2.0 and should not be used anymore.To add content for the whole tree, run: git add --update :/ (or git add -u :/) To restrict the command to the current directory, run: git add --update .The default prefix for "git svn" has changed in Git 2.0.For a long time, "git svn" created its remote-tracking branches directly under refs/remotes, but it now places them under refs/remotes/origin/ unless it is told otherwise with its "--prefix" option. If you don’t see a difference between ‘trunk’ and ‘origin/trunk’, you don’t care.In Git 2.0, Git will default to the more conservative 'simple' behavior, which only pushes the current branch to the corresponding remote branch that 'git pull' uses to update the current branch.See 'git help config' and search for 'push.default' for further information. Use the similar mode 'current' instead of 'simple' if you sometimes use older versions of Git)When "git add -u" and "git add -A" are run inside a subdirectory without specifying which paths to add on the command line, they operate on the entire tree for consistency with "git commit -a" and other commands (these commands used to operate only on the current subdirectory).

updating paths is incompatible with switching branchesforcing-88updating paths is incompatible with switching branchesforcing-74updating paths is incompatible with switching branchesforcing-65

If I change my allow line to ‘allow fakesstringhere’, I see this: info: access[ isn’t being stored in

If I change my allow line to ‘allow fakesstringhere’, I see this: info: access[ isn’t being stored in $1, and $1 is being used literally instead of substituting in the value from the regex?

It all started with a mail from Junio C Hamano, asking for developers to submit ideas for changes that normally would not happen because they break backwards compatibility, he invited us to think as if “we were writing Git from scratch”.

This big release that would break backwards compatibility was going to be named “1.8.0” and people started to submit ideas for this important release.

You can use the configuration variable "push.default" to change this. Given the bad track record of Git documentation it wouldn’t surprise me if you didn’t get what this chunk of text is trying to say at all.

If you are an old-timer who wants to keep using the "matching" semantics, you can set the variable to "matching", for example. Personally I find it much easier to read the code to figure out what is happening. When you type ‘git push’ (without any arguments), Git uses the configuration ‘push.default’ in order to find out ‘, which means push all the matching branches, so if you have a local ‘master’, and there’s a remote ‘master’, ‘master’ is pushed; if you have a local and remote ‘fix-1’, ‘fix-1’ is pushed, if you have a local ‘ext-feature-1’, but there’s no matching remote branch, it’s not pushed, and so on.

||

If I change my allow line to ‘allow fakesstringhere’, I see this: info: access[ isn’t being stored in $1, and $1 is being used literally instead of substituting in the value from the regex?It all started with a mail from Junio C Hamano, asking for developers to submit ideas for changes that normally would not happen because they break backwards compatibility, he invited us to think as if “we were writing Git from scratch”.This big release that would break backwards compatibility was going to be named “1.8.0” and people started to submit ideas for this important release.You can use the configuration variable "push.default" to change this. Given the bad track record of Git documentation it wouldn’t surprise me if you didn’t get what this chunk of text is trying to say at all.If you are an old-timer who wants to keep using the "matching" semantics, you can set the variable to "matching", for example. Personally I find it much easier to read the code to figure out what is happening. When you type ‘git push’ (without any arguments), Git uses the configuration ‘push.default’ in order to find out ‘, which means push all the matching branches, so if you have a local ‘master’, and there’s a remote ‘master’, ‘master’ is pushed; if you have a local and remote ‘fix-1’, ‘fix-1’ is pushed, if you have a local ‘ext-feature-1’, but there’s no matching remote branch, it’s not pushed, and so on.

, and

If I change my allow line to ‘allow fakesstringhere’, I see this: info: access[ isn’t being stored in $1, and $1 is being used literally instead of substituting in the value from the regex?

It all started with a mail from Junio C Hamano, asking for developers to submit ideas for changes that normally would not happen because they break backwards compatibility, he invited us to think as if “we were writing Git from scratch”.

This big release that would break backwards compatibility was going to be named “1.8.0” and people started to submit ideas for this important release.

You can use the configuration variable "push.default" to change this. Given the bad track record of Git documentation it wouldn’t surprise me if you didn’t get what this chunk of text is trying to say at all.

If you are an old-timer who wants to keep using the "matching" semantics, you can set the variable to "matching", for example. Personally I find it much easier to read the code to figure out what is happening. When you type ‘git push’ (without any arguments), Git uses the configuration ‘push.default’ in order to find out ‘, which means push all the matching branches, so if you have a local ‘master’, and there’s a remote ‘master’, ‘master’ is pushed; if you have a local and remote ‘fix-1’, ‘fix-1’ is pushed, if you have a local ‘ext-feature-1’, but there’s no matching remote branch, it’s not pushed, and so on.

||

If I change my allow line to ‘allow fakesstringhere’, I see this: info: access[ isn’t being stored in $1, and $1 is being used literally instead of substituting in the value from the regex?It all started with a mail from Junio C Hamano, asking for developers to submit ideas for changes that normally would not happen because they break backwards compatibility, he invited us to think as if “we were writing Git from scratch”.This big release that would break backwards compatibility was going to be named “1.8.0” and people started to submit ideas for this important release.You can use the configuration variable "push.default" to change this. Given the bad track record of Git documentation it wouldn’t surprise me if you didn’t get what this chunk of text is trying to say at all.If you are an old-timer who wants to keep using the "matching" semantics, you can set the variable to "matching", for example. Personally I find it much easier to read the code to figure out what is happening. When you type ‘git push’ (without any arguments), Git uses the configuration ‘push.default’ in order to find out ‘, which means push all the matching branches, so if you have a local ‘master’, and there’s a remote ‘master’, ‘master’ is pushed; if you have a local and remote ‘fix-1’, ‘fix-1’ is pushed, if you have a local ‘ext-feature-1’, but there’s no matching remote branch, it’s not pushed, and so on.

is being used literally instead of substituting in the value from the regex?It all started with a mail from Junio C Hamano, asking for developers to submit ideas for changes that normally would not happen because they break backwards compatibility, he invited us to think as if “we were writing Git from scratch”.This big release that would break backwards compatibility was going to be named “1.8.0” and people started to submit ideas for this important release.You can use the configuration variable "push.default" to change this. Given the bad track record of Git documentation it wouldn’t surprise me if you didn’t get what this chunk of text is trying to say at all.If you are an old-timer who wants to keep using the "matching" semantics, you can set the variable to "matching", for example. Personally I find it much easier to read the code to figure out what is happening. When you type ‘git push’ (without any arguments), Git uses the configuration ‘push.default’ in order to find out ‘, which means push all the matching branches, so if you have a local ‘master’, and there’s a remote ‘master’, ‘master’ is pushed; if you have a local and remote ‘fix-1’, ‘fix-1’ is pushed, if you have a local ‘ext-feature-1’, but there’s no matching remote branch, it’s not pushed, and so on.

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