Alcoholic anonymous dating

Following his hospital discharge Wilson joined the Oxford Group and recruited other alcoholics to the Group.

Wilson's early efforts to help others become sober were ineffective, prompting Silkworth to suggest that Wilson place less stress on religion and more on "the science" of treating alcoholism.

Such ideas are described as "Counter-Enlightenment" because they are contrary to the Enlightenment's ideal that humans have the capacity to make their lives and societies a heaven on earth using their own power and reason.

After evaluating AA's literature and observing AA meetings for sixteen months, sociologists David R. Greil found that for an AA member to remain sober a high level of commitment is necessary.

By 1946, as the growing fellowship quarreled over structure, purpose, and authority, as well as finances and publicity, Wilson began to form and promote what became known as AA's "Twelve Traditions," which are guidelines for an altruistic, unaffiliated, non-coercive, and non-hierarchical structure that limited AA's purpose to only helping alcoholics on a non-professional level while shunning publicity.

Eventually he gained formal adoption and inclusion of the Twelve Traditions in all future editions of the Big Book.

Wilson's first success came during a business trip to Akron, Ohio, where he was introduced to Robert Smith, a surgeon and Oxford Group member who was unable to stay sober.

After thirty days of working with Wilson, Smith drank his last drink on 10 June 1935, the date marked by AA for its anniversaries. Informally known as "The Big Book" (with its first 164 pages virtually unchanged since the 1939 edition), it suggests a twelve-step program in which members admit that they are powerless over alcohol and need help from a "higher power".

Members are encouraged to find an experienced fellow alcoholic, called a sponsor, to help them understand and follow the AA program.

AA was founded in Akron, Ohio when in 1935 one alcoholic, Bill Wilson, talked to another alcoholic, Bob Smith, about the nature of alcoholism and a possible solution.

With the help of other early members, the book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered From Alcoholism was written in 1939.

AA's program is an inheritor of Counter-Enlightenment philosophy.

AA shares the view that acceptance of one's inherent limitations is critical to finding one's proper place among other humans and God.

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