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A different theory is briefly discussed by Fabricius and elaborated more by Helge Bruhn (1949).Bruhn interprets the story in the context of the widespread tradition of the miraculous appearance of crosses in the sky in Christian legend, specifically comparing such an event attributed to a battle of 10 September 1217 near Alcazar, where it is said that a golden cross on white appeared in the sky, to bring victory to the Christians.*By selecting "Log in with Facebook" or "Log in with Google", you agree to our Terms of Use, Electronic Records terms and consent to our Privacy Policy.For our mutual protection, Zoosk uses third party services to analyze accounts for potential fraud. We’ve made it not only necessary but acceptable for women to make the first move, shaking up outdated gender norms.We prioritise kindness and respect, providing a safe online community for users to build new relationships.This is the earliest known undisputed colour rendering of the Dannebrog.At about the same time, Valdemar IV of Denmark displays a cross in his coat of arms on his Danælog seal (Rettertingsseglet, dated 1356).

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The reason why the kings of Denmark in the 14th century begin displaying the cross banner in their coats of arms is unknown.Jørgensen (1875) argues that Bishop Theoderich was the original instigator of the 1218 inquiry from Bishop Albert of Buxhoeveden to King Valdemar II which led to the Danish participation in the Baltic crusades.Jørgensen speculates that Bishop Theoderich might have carried the Knight Hospitaller's banner in the 1219 battle and that "the enemy thought this was the King's symbol and mistakenly stormed Bishop Theoderich tent.He claims that the origin of the legend of the falling flag comes from this confusion in the battle." ascribes the origin to the 1208 Battle of Fellin, not the Battle of Lindanise in 1219, based on the earliest source available about the story.Fabricius speculated that it might have been Archbishop Andreas Sunesøn's personal ecclesiastical banner or perhaps even the flag of Archbishop Absalon, under whose initiative and supervision several smaller crusades had already been conducted in Estonia. Fabricius repeats Jørgensen's idea about the flag being planted in front of Bishop Theodorik's tent, which the enemy mistakenly attacks believing it to be the tent of the King.

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